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Caitlin Young C&T 802 Culminating Paper Developing a Mathematics Curriculum for Jayhawkville USD Preparing our students for the world they will have to live in is a daunting and important task. Teachers and administrators can often feel overwhelmed to know what to teach students to help them become successful citizens, and it can be difficult to know what skills they will need for jobs that have not even been created, “District and school leaders are currently facing
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  Caitlin Young C&T 802 Culminating Paper Developing a Mathematics Curriculum for Jayhawkville USD Preparing our students for the world they will have to live in is a daunting and important task. Teachers and administrators can often feel overwhelmed to know what to teach students to help them become successful citizens, and it can be difficult to know what skills they will need for jobs that have not even been created, “ District and school leaders are currently facing numerous decisions on curriculum adoption, assessment, and professional development. These decisions will have tremendous long- term impacts.”  (Glatthorn, Boschee, Whitehead, & Boschee, 2016, p. 162) Thankfully the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) give school leaders some guidance of what is expected from their students. The CCSS was developed by the states collaboratively to teach the skills that students will need in the future, “ CCSS can help address this situation in that it is both focused (fewer CCSS than existing state standards) and coherent (supports concepts as well as skills). CCSS requires a new set of instructional competencies.” (Glatthorn, Boschee, Whitehead, & Boschee, 2016, p. 162) Using these collaboratively made standards as the basis of curriculum development allows teachers and districts to give their students the 21 st   century skills needed for higher education and employment. Jayhawkville is facing situations that districts across the country are facing. Schools in every state are seeing an increase in poverty and free and reduced lunch. We know that these students have different challenges to their learning that need to  be addressed through curriculum. Jayhawkville is also seeing population growth that is increasing the diversity of the student population. Our curriculum needs to address multicultural education to allow all students to feel comfortable and respected. Jayhawkville and all schools across the country are now being tasked with teaching technology and other 21 st   century skills that students will need to be competent in for the future. We also have to consider the prevalence of high stakes testing in our country and prepare students to be successful on the numerous tests that they will unavoidably have to take in order to continue their education. Our new mathematics curriculum will have to address all of these changes in order to ensure that we “keep reinventing our schools to prepare for the future.” (Glatthorn, Boschee, Whitehead, & Boschee, 2016, p. 175) In order to develop the new math curriculum, a task force will be developed. The task force will include a mixture of administration, community members, and most importantly teachers. We are suggesting that Fred Goings, principal of Central High School, be the leader of the task force. He is a former award-winning math teacher and also has the perspective of being a principal. Because of the lack of representation on the Board of Education for the Central attendance area, we are also suggesting that Carla Garcia be a part of our task force. She was also chosen because she expresses a concern that we have about the disparity between schools and she wants to focus on equity. She also states an interest in technology integration, which will be at the forefront of our new curriculum. In addition to Fred and Carla there should also be two to four teachers from each grade level who will work to develop the new math curriculum.  One of the responsibilities of the task force will include gathering input from parents and other community members. With the CCSS being so controversial we know that, “involving stakeholders is a key to success -especially in that communities often support a curriculum they help create.” (Glatthorn, Boschee, Whitehead, & Boschee, 2016, p. 196) We will have the principals of each school pick the teachers that they would like involved in the curriculum planning, as the principals know their staff and their specific school needs. This task force will have many responsibilities including finding resources for teachers, creating pacing guides, finding a way to effectively collect data, creating common assessments, and taking into account teacher and parent feedback. Our task force will use the A.D.D.I.E model for curriculum framework, which stands for analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation (Glatthorn, Boschee, Whitehead, & Boschee, 2016, p. 191). For the analysis portion of curriculum development, our main goal will be to familiarize teachers and administrators with the standards. The CCSS is a paradigm shift in teaching and may initially feel overwhelming to teachers. However, it is crucial that teachers understand the rationale behind the standards. The CCSS is controversial because it is a new way of learning math that will feel foreign to parents. This had led to many myths and misconceptions about CCSS. If our administration and teachers are properly trained to use the standards, they can communicate the rationale of CCSS with the community. Our teachers must be able to dispel the myths of the CCSS to the parents and give them tools to help their children understand the new ways of thinking about math. This can only be done if  our teachers fully comprehend the standards and their rationale themselves. In order to accomplish this task, we are asking that teachers complete a free online training webinar developed by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Shifting from the Elephant in the Room to Ownership of the Common Core State Standards: A Capacity-Building Implementation Plan (Clifton, 2013). This webinar will provide teachers an overview of the standards and the rationale behind them so that they can effectively communicate that to parents. The next portion of the A.D.D.I.E curriculum development process is design. This is where our task force will complete the majority of their responsibilities such as creating pacing guides, finding resources, creating assessments, and designing ways to easily collect data. Since this is a large task, we propose that the task force meet over the summer to accomplish these tasks before school starts. Due to budget cuts, we are trying to keep costs of the new curriculum to a minimum. In order to achieve this, we are proposing that our task force look for free online resources that align with the standards. In addition to saving money, we know that technology provides high engagement and 21 st   Century skills to students. We are proposing a blended approach to learning because of the promising research associated with blended learning. One meta-analysis found that blended learning, “On average produces stronger student learning outcomes than learning solely through face-to- face instruction.”  (Means, Toyoma, Murphy, & Baki, 2013, p. 29) A 2010 study from the Department of Education stated, “Online learning is as effective as face-to-face learning, and that blended learning is considerably more effective than either.” (Koller, 2011, p. 3) This effect is particularly true for at risk students,
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