Mark Baildon , Re-thinking Social Studies Source Work in the Digital Age

|
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
 18 views
of 20

Please download to get full document.

View again

Description
Media, Civic Participation, and Humanities Education HSSE Symposium Redesigning Pedagogy Conference, Singapore 4 June 2013. Mark Baildon , Re-thinking Social Studies Source Work in the Digital Age Li-Ching Ho & Mark Baildon , The Online Citizen: Youth, Civic Participation & Social Media
Share
Transcript
Media, Civic Participation, and Humanities EducationHSSE SymposiumRedesigning Pedagogy Conference, Singapore4 June 2013 Mark Baildon, Re-thinking Social Studies Source Work in the Digital Age Li-Ching Ho & Mark Baildon, The Online Citizen: Youth, Civic Participation & Social Media National Institute of Education, Singapore Jeremy Stoddard, Using Film in Historical Inquiry & for Engaging in Controversial Issues College of William & Mary, USA Re-thinking Social Studies Source Work in the Digital Age Mark Baildon National Institute of Education, Singapore Redesigning Pedagogy Conference, Singapore 4 June 2013 Introduction
  • Explore source work with digital sources
  • Evaluate reliability of Facebook page
  • Challenges
  • Implications for teaching
  • Background
  • Research study: source work with online sources
  • Critical Web Reader http://www.delvelearning.com/wordpress/?page_id=47
  • Inquiry: “How Affordable is Healthcare in Singapore?”
  • MOH YouTube video
  • Nicole Seah Facebook page
  • The Online Citizen
  • Ron Paul website
  • Lenses/scaffolds
  • Inference of purpose
  • Evaluating usefulness
  • Evaluating reliability
  • Task (with a partner)
  • Evaluate the reliability of Nicole Seah Facebook page, “Is Healthcare Affordable in Singapore? Here is My Take” (http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=139911682746578)
  • Use Worksheet
  • Context: How Affordable is Healthcare in Singapore?”
  • Your evaluation of reliability
  • Challenges
  • Similar/different to print sources?
  • 15” Discussion
  • Share your evaluation of the reliability of Nicole Seah’sFacebook page, “Is Healthcare Affordable in Singapore? Here is My Take”
  • To what extent reliable? Why?
  • How did you evaluate its reliability? What did you do and/or discuss? What helped you evaluate reliability?
  • What challenges did you encounter?
  • Similar/different to evaluating print sources?
  • 1o” Study findings
  • Students more motivated, engaged, resourceful working with online sources
  • Use of procedural scaffolding (i.e., steps)
  • All students found source unreliable because it had purpose (i.e., purpose = unreliable)
  • Lack of understanding about why they perform steps/procedures & how helps them evaluate reliability
  • How reliable is Nicole Seah’s FB page? Here’s my take How reliable is Nicole Seah’s FB page? Here’s my take Why this is a complex source
  • Social media (i.e., Facebook) have different purposes (i.e., for relationship, self-presentation) but increasingly being used for political & commercial purposes
  • Use of rhetorical questions
  • High knowledge demands: knowledge about Singapore’s healthcare system, other policies, resource allocation, etc.
  • Key ideas
  • Citizens and consumers need reliable information to make informed decisions.
  • Evaluating reliability of online sources more challenging.
  • Need conceptual understanding of reliability and reliability evaluation (how and why).
  • Web can be used to manage these challenges.
  • Reliable info needed for informed decisions
  • Greater burden on individuals to get reliable information and assess its meaning and relevance accurately
  • Highly consequential: assessing reliability inaccurately can have serious social, personal, educational, relational, health, and financial consequences
  • High importance to citizenship: drives social agendas, degree & nature of engagement in public discourse, determination of public policy, etc. (Flanagin & Metzger, 2008)
  • Challenge of online sources
  • Range of complex information sources (multimodality, websites, video, social media, etc.)
  • Challenge of online sources
  • Information overload (multiple views, competing accounts, increased knowledge demands)
  • Greater likelihood of useless information (little relevance or use), misinformation & “doctored” information (altered/edited photos & videos clips), attempts to deliberately deceive people (e.g., Internet hoaxes)
  • Challenge of online sources
  • Ill-defined criteria & standards to help us manage complex sources & info overload
  • New uses for online formats (e.g., politicians using Facebook)
  • Easy for anyone to create & disseminate
  • Lack of vetting process
  • Author credentials & qualifications often hard to determine
  • Complex, multi-faceted problems – High knowledge demands
  • Global & local impact
  • Cross-disciplinary
  • Understand & address multiple causes
  • political, economic, historical, cultural, etc.
  • Need understanding of interconnection
  • New thinking, new ways of acting
  • Understanding mediated by media, digital information sources
  • Climate change
  • War & Terrorism
  • Inequality
  • Water shortages
  • Food crises
  • Ocean life destruction
  • Disease James Martin (2007). The Meaning of the Twenty-First Century.
  • Using the Web to manage challenges
  • Online procedures to authenticate sources:
  • Online searches on author provenance & background
  • Check digital trace or history of source
  • Use online networks & media outlets to check authenticity (e.g., Snopes, Politfact)
  • Engage source to request further information - place burden of proof on source itself
  • Meier (2011); http://irevolution.net/2011/06/21/information-forensics/ Using the Web to manage challenges
  • Use Internet to track down key information, check internal multimodal consistency (e.g., check images or links provided as evidence)
  • Use Internet to gain necessary background knowledge, cross reference, check & confirm information
  • These moves require understanding how the Internet works & how to use it strategically. New understandings and procedures to help students use Internet as a tool to evaluate the reliability of information
  • Meier (2011); http://irevolution.net/2011/06/21/information-forensics/ Implications for teaching
  • Scaffolding does not mean imposition of a structure on the student (Searle, 1984)
  • Scaffolding understanding:
  • Reliability as judgment based on criteria, argument, evidence
  • Why important to analyze content (e.g., to check accuracy);
  • Why important to cross-reference (e.g., to corroborate);
  • Why need to determine purpose and source bias and how this may (or may not) help to evaluate reliability;
  • How to use Web & other resources to do this work.
  • Need to see source skills in broader contexts (of inquiry, of learning to live in info-rich society, etc.).
  • Conclusion: Managing tensions
    Related Search
    We Need Your Support
    Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

    Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

    No, Thanks