Arthur Conan Doyle - The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes[1]

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The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes Doyle, Arthur Conan Published: 1892 Categorie(s): Fiction, Mystery & Detective, Short Stories Source: http://gutenberg.org About Doyle: Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859 7 July 1930) was a Scottish author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and the adventures of Professor Challenger. He was a prolific writer whose other works include scie
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  The Adventures of Sherlock HolmesDoyle, Arthur ConanPublished: 1892Categorie(s): Fiction, Mystery & Detective, Short StoriesSource: http://gutenberg.org  About Doyle:Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859  7 July 1930) was aScottish author most noted for his stories about the detective SherlockHolmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the fieldof crime fiction, and the adventures of Professor Challenger. He was aprolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, historicalnovels, plays and romances, poetry, and non-fiction. Conan was srcinallya given name, but Doyle used it as part of his surname in his lateryears. Source: WikipediaAlso available on Feedbooks for Doyle:  The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes (1923)  The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (1893)  The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1905)  The Hound of the Baskervilles (1902)  A Study in Scarlet (1887)  The Lost World (1912)  The Sign of the Four (1890)  His Last Bow (1917)  The Valley of Fear (1915)  The Disintegration Machine (1928)Copyright: This work is available for countries where copyright isLife+70 and in the USA.Note: This book is brought to you by Feedbookshttp://www.feedbooks.comStrictly for personal use, do not use this file for commercial purposes.  Part 1A SCANDAL IN BOHEMIA  Chapter 1 Chapter 1To Sherlock Holmes she is always THE woman. I have seldom heardhim mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominatesthe whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akinto love for Irene Adler. All emotions, and that one particularly, were abhorrent to his cold, precise but admirably balanced mind. He was, I takeit, the most perfect reasoning and observing machine that the world hasseen, but as a lover he would have placed himself in a false position. Henever spoke of the softer passions, save with a gibe and a sneer. Theywere admirable things for the observer  excellent for drawing the veilfrom men's motives and actions. But for the trained reasoner to admitsuch intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperamentwas to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon allhis mental results. Grit in a sensitive instrument, or a crack in one of hisown high-power lenses, would not be more disturbing than a strongemotion in a nature such as his. And yet there was but one woman tohim, and that woman was the late Irene Adler, of dubious and questionablememory.I had seen little of Holmes lately. My marriage had drifted us awayfrom each other. My own complete happiness, and the home-centred interestswhich rise up around the man who first finds himself master ofhis own establishment, were sufficient to absorb all my attention, whileHolmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemiansoul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his oldbooks, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition,the drowsiness of the drug, and the fierce energy of his own keennature. He was still, as ever, deeply attracted by the study of crime, andoccupied his immense faculties and extraordinary powers of observationin following out those clues, and clearing up those mysteries which hadbeen abandoned as hopeless by the official police. From time to time Iheard some vague account of his doings: of his summons to Odessa inthe case of the Trepoff murder, of his clearing up of the singular tragedyof the Atkinson brothers at Trincomalee, and finally of the mission which
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