Chapter 16:Capital Structure Decisions ( II )

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Chapter 16:Capital Structure Decisions ( II ). MM models, with and without corporate taxes Miller model, with corporate and personal taxes Extension to MM when there is growth and the tax shield is risky Equity as an option. Who are Modigliani and Miller (MM)?.
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Chapter 16:Capital Structure Decisions ( II )
  • MM models, with and without corporate taxes
  • Miller model, with corporate and personal taxes
  • Extension to MM when there is growth and the tax shield is risky
  • Equity as an option
  • Who are Modigliani and Miller (MM)?
  • They published theoretical papers that changed the way people thought about financial leverage.
  • They won Nobel prizes in economics because of their work.
  • MM’s papers were published in 1958 and 1963. Miller had a separate paper in 1977. The papers differed in their assumptions about taxes.
  • Assumptions underlie the MM and Miller Models
  • Firms can be grouped into homogeneous classes based on business risk.
  • Investors have identical expectations about firms’ future earnings.
  • There are no transactions costs.
  • All debt is riskless, and both individuals and corporations can borrow unlimited amounts of money at the risk-free rate.
  • All cash flows are perpetuities. This implies perpetual debt is issued, firms have zero growth, and expected EBIT is constant over time.
  • MM’s first paper (1958) assumed zero taxes. Later papers added taxes.
  • No agency or financial distress costs.
  • These assumptions were necessary for MM to prove their propositions on the basis of investor arbitrage.
  • MM with Zero Taxes (1958)Proposition I:VL = VU.Proposition II:rsL = rsU + (rsU - rd)(D/S).ExampleGiven the following data, find V, S, rs, and WACC for Firms U and L.
  • Firms U and L are in same risk class.
  • EBITU,L = $500,000.
  • Firm U has no debt; rsU = 14%.
  • Firm L has $1,000,000 debt at rd = 8%.
  • The basic MM assumptions hold.
  • There are no corporate or personal taxes.
  • EBITrsU$500,0000.14VU = = = $3,571,429.VL = VU = $3,571,429.1. Find VU and VL.2. Find the market valueFind the market value of Firm L’s debt and equity.VL = D + S = $3,571,429 $3,571,429 = $1,000,000 + S S = $2,571,429.rsL = rsU + (rsU - rd)(D/S) = 14.0% + (14.0% - 8.0%)( ) = 14.0% + 2.33% = 16.33%.$1,000,000$2,571,4293. Find rsL.WACC = wdrd + wsrs= (D/V)rd + (S/V)rs = ()(8.0%) +()(16.33%) = 2.24% + 11.76% = 14.00%.$1,000,000$3,571,429$2,571,429$3,571,4294. Proposition I implies WACC = rsU. Verify for L using WACC formula.Without taxesCost of Capital (%)262014 8rsWACCrdDebt/Value Ratio (%)0 20 40 60 80 100MM MM Relationships Between Capital Costs and Leverage (D/V)MM
  • The more debt the firm adds to its capital structure, the riskier the equity becomes and thus the higher its cost.
  • Although rd remains constant, rsincreases with leverage. The increase in rs is exactly sufficient to keep the WACC constant.
  • Value of Firm, V (%)4321VLVUFirm value ($3.6 million)0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5Debt (millions of $)Graph value versus leverage.With zero taxes, MM argue that value is unaffected by leverage.MM with Corporate TaxV, S, rs, and WACC for Firms U and L (40% Corporate Tax Rate)With corporate taxes added, the MM propositions become:Proposition I:VL = VU + TD.Proposition II:rsL = rsU + (rsU - rd)(1 - T)(D/S).Notes About the New Propositions
  • 1. When corporate taxes are added,VL ≠ VU. VL increases as debt is added to the capital structure, and the greater the debt usage, the higher the value of the firm.
  • 2. rsL increases with leverage at a slower rate when corporate taxes are considered.
  • EBIT(1 - T)rsU$500,000(0.6)0.14VU = = = $2,142,857.1. Find VU and VL.Note: Represents a 40% decline from the no taxes situation.VL = VU + TD = $2,142,857 + 0.4($1,000,000) = $2,142,857 + $400,000 = $2,542,857.2. Find market value of Firm L’s debt and equity.VL= D + S = $2,542,857  $2,542,857= $1,000,000 + S S= $1,542,857. = 14.0% + (14.0% - 8.0%)(0.6)( ) = 14.0% + 2.33% = 16.33%.$1,000,000$1,542,8573. Find rsL.rsL = rsU + (rsU - rd)(1 - T)(D/S)WACCL = (D/V)rd(1 - T) + (S/V)rs = ()(8.0%)(0.6) +()(16.33%) = 1.89% + 9.91% = 11.80%.When corporate taxes are considered, the WACC is lower for L than for U.$1,000,000$2,542,857$1,542,857$2,542,8574. Find Firm L’s WACC.Cost of Capital (%)rs262014 8WACCrd(1 - T)Debt/Value Ratio (%)0 20 40 60 80 100MM: Capital Costs vs. Leverage with Corporate TaxesValue of Firm, V (%)4321VLTDVUDebt(Millions of $)0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5MM: Value vs. Debt with Corporate TaxesUnder MM with corporate taxes, the firm’s value increases continuously as more and more debt is used.Miller’s Proposition I:VL = VU + [1 - ]D.Tc = corporate tax rate.Td = personal tax rate on debt income.Ts = personal tax rate on stock income.(1 - Tc)(1 - Ts)(1 - Td)Miller Model with Personal TaxesVL = VU + [1 - ]D = VU + (1 - 0.75)D = VU + 0.25D.(1 - 0.40)(1 - 0.12)(1 - 0.30)Tc = 40%, Td = 30%, and Ts = 12%.Value rises with debt; each $100 increase in debt raises L’s value by $25.Miller vs. MM Model with Corporate taxes
  • If only corporate taxes, then
  • VL = VU + TcD = VU + 0.40D.
  • Here $100 of debt raises value by $40. Thus, personal taxes lowers the gain from leverage, but the net effect depends on tax rates.
  • If Ts declines, while Tc and Td remain constant, the slope coefficient (which shows the benefit of debt) is decreased.
  • A company with a low payout ratio gets lower benefits under the Miller model than a company with a high payout, because a low payout decreases Ts.
  • Why do personal taxes lower value of debt?
  • Corporate tax laws favor debt over equity financing because interest expense is tax deductible while dividends are not.
  • However, personal tax laws favor equity over debt because stocks provide both tax deferral and a lower capital gains tax rate.
  • This lowers the relative cost of equity vis-a-vis MM’s no-personal-tax world and decreases the spread between debt and equity costs.
  • Thus, some of the advantage of debt financing is lost, so debt financing is less valuable to firms.
  • SummaryWhat does capital structure theory prescribe for corporate managers?
  • MM, No Taxes: Capital structure is irrelevant--no impact on value or WACC.
  • MM, Corporate Taxes: Value increases, so firms should use (almost) 100% debt financing.
  • Miller, Personal Taxes: Value increases, but less than under MM, so again firms should use (almost) 100% debt financing.
  • HoweverDo firms follow the recommendations of capital structure theory?
  • Firms don’t follow MM/Miller to 100% debt. Debt ratios average about 40%.
  • However, debt ratios did increase after MM. Many think debt ratios were too low, and MM led to changes in financial policies.
  • Firm GrowthHow is analysis different if firms U and L are growing?
  • Under MM (with taxes and no growth)
  • VL = VU + TD
  • This assumes the tax shield is discounted at the cost of debt.
  • Assume the growth rate is 7%
  • The debt tax shield will be larger if the firms grow:
  • Value of (growing) tax shield = VTS = rdTD/(rTS –g)So value of levered firm =VL = VU + rdTD/(rTS – g)7% growth, TS discount rate of rTSWhat should rTS be?
  • The smaller is rTS, the larger the value of the tax shield. If rTS < rsU, then with rapid growth the tax shield becomes unrealistically large—rTS must be equal to rU to give reasonable results when there is growth. So we assume rTS = rsU.
  • Levered cost of equity
  • In this case, the levered cost of equity is rsL = rsU + (rsU – rd)(D/S)
  • This looks just like MM without taxes even though we allow taxes and allow for growth. The reason is if rTS = rsU, then larger values of the tax shield don't change the risk of the equity.
  • Levered beta
  • If there is growth and rTS = rsU then the equation that is equivalent to the Hamada equation is
  • bL = bU + (bU - bD)(D/S)
  • Notice: This looks like Hamada without taxes. Again, this is because in this case the tax shield doesn't change the risk of the equity.
  • Relevant information for valuation
  • EBIT = $500,000
  • T = 40%
  • rU = 14% = rTS
  • rd = 8%
  • Required reinvestment in net operating assets = 10% of EBIT = $50,000.
  • Debt = $1,000,000
  • NOPAT = EBIT(1-T) = $500,000 (.60) = $300,000Investment in net op. assets = EBIT (0.10) = $50,000 FCF = NOPAT – Inv. in net op. assets = $300,000 - $50,000 = $250,000 (this is expected FCF next year)Calculating VUValue of unlevered firm, VU
  • Value of unlevered firm =
  • VU= FCF/(rsU – g) = $250,000/(0.14 – 0.07) = $3,571,429VTS = rdTD/(rsU – g) = 0.08(0.40)$1,000,000/(0.14-0.07) = $457,143VL = VU + VTS = $3,571,429 + $457,143 = $4,028,571Value of tax shield, VTS and VLCost of equity and WACC
  • Just like with MM with taxes, the cost of equity increases with D/V, and the WACC declines.
  • But since rsL doesn't have the (1-T) factor in it, for a given D/V, rsL is greater than MM would predict, and WACC is greater than MM would predict.
  • Cost of Capital for MM and ExtensionWhat if L's debt is risky?
  • If L's debt is risky then, by definition, management might default on it. The decision to make a payment on the debt or to default looks very much like the decision whether to exercise a call option. So the equity looks like an option.
  • Equity as an option
  • Suppose the firm has $2 million face value of 1-year zero coupon debt, and the current value of the firm (debt plus equity) is $4 million.
  • If the firm pays off the debt when it matures, the equity holders get to keep the firm. If not, they get nothing because the debtholders foreclose.
  • Equity as an option
  • The equity holder's position looks like a call option with
  • P = underlying value of firm = $4 million
  • X = exercise price = $2 million
  • t = time to maturity = 1 year
  • Suppose rRF = 6%
  •  = volatility of debt + equity = 0.60
  • V = P[N(d1)] - Xe–rRFt [N(d2)].ln(P/X) + [rRF + (σ2/2)]t .d1 =√σ td1 √- σ t .d2 =Use Black-Scholes to price this optionV = $4[N(d1)] - $2e -(0.06)(1.0) [N(d2)].ln($4/$2) + [(0.06 + 0.36/2)](1.0)d1 =(0.60)(1.0)= 1.5552.d2 =d1 – (0.60)(1.0) = d1 – 0.60= 1.5552 – 0.6000 = 0.9552.Black-Scholes SolutionN(d1) = N(1.5552) = 0.9401N(d2) = N(0.9552) = 0.8383Note: Values obtained from Excel using NORMSDIST function.V = $4(0.9401) - $2e-0.06(0.8303) = $3.7604 - $2(0.9418)(0.8303) = $2.196 Million = Value of EquityValue of Debt
  • The value of debt must be what is left over:
  • Value of debt = Total Value – Equity = $4 million – 2.196 million = $1.804 millionThis value of debt gives us a yield
  • Debt yield for 1-year zero coupon debt
  • = (face value / price) – 1 = ($2 million/ 1.804 million) – 1 = 10.9%How does  affect an option's value?
  • Higher volatility  means higher option value !!
  • Managerial Incentives
  • When an investor buys a stock option, the riskiness of the stock () is already determined. But a manager can change a firm's  by changing the assets the firm invests in. That means changing  can change the value of the equity, even if it doesn't change the expected cash flows.
  • So changing  can transfer wealth from bondholders to stockholders by making the option value of the stock worth more, which makes what is left, the debt value, worth less.
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