Chapter 23: An Era of Social Change Section 3: Culture and Counterculture

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Chapter 23: An Era of Social Change Section 3: Culture and Counterculture. C alifornia A cademic S tandards : 11.8.8 & 11.9.4 11.8 Students analyze the economic boom and social transformation of post-World War II America.
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Chapter 23:An Era of Social ChangeSection 3:Culture and Counterculture
  • California Academic Standards:11.8.8 & 11.9.4
  • 11.8 Students analyze the economic boom and social transformation of post-World War II America.
  • .8 Discuss forms of popular culture, with emphasis on their origins and geographic diffusion (e.g., jazz and other forms of popular music, professional sports, architectural and artistic styles).
  • 11.9 Students analyze U.S. foreign policy since World War II.
  • .4 List the effects of foreign policy on domestic policies and vice versa (e.g., protests during the war in Vietnam, the "nuclear freeze" movement).
  • Objectives:
  • Following lecture and reading of this section, students will be able to:
  • Describe the flowering and the decline of the counterculture in the 1960s.
  • Summarize the impact of the counterculture on art, fashion, music, and attitudes.
  • Show how mainstream America’s response to the counterculture set the nation on a more conservative course.
  • Overview:
  • Members of the 1960s counterculture movement rejected mainstream society’s values and attempted to create a world of peace, love, and harmony.
  • Though short lived, the movement had a significant impact on art, fashion, music, and attitudes toward sex and human relationships.
  • However, the counterculture and antiwar movements also sparked a conservative movement, which helped propel Richard Nixon into the White House.
  • The Counterculture
  • Members of the counterculture movement of the 1960 and 1970s were mainly white and middle-class.
  • The counterculture movement helped to popularize all of the following: pop art, blue jeans, and rock music.
  • Timothy Leary provided the counterculture movement with the philosophy of "Tune in, turn on, drop out."
  • Members of the counter culture reject mainstream society and try to create an idyllic world of peace, love, and harmony.
  • Hippie life usually involved rock ‘n’ roll, outrageous clothing and appearance, and drugs.
  • During the 1960s, Haight-Ashbury became the "hippie capital" of the United States.
  • Many members of the counterculture movement sought enlightenment through the teachings of Eastern religions.
  • After a few years, the counterculture’s peace and harmony gave way to violence, drug abuse, and disillusionment.
  • The counterculture movement was not weakened by the effects of drug use dependency on mainstream America.
  • A Changing Culture gave way to violence, drug abuse, and disillusionment.
  • The rebelliousness of the counterculture influences styles of art and fashion.
  • Hippies embrace rock music as their anthem of social protest cultural change.
  • Woodstock was the site of a famous, peaceful rock concert held in 1969.
  • The counterculture leaves a legacy of more relaxed attitudes towards sex, marriage, behavior, and relationships
  • The Conservative Response
  • Conservative Americans voice their anger with student rebellions and the counterculture.
  • The response of angry mainstream Americans helps propel Richard Nixon into the White House.
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