Helen Coates Lessons 1-4 (2)

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Lesson One Grade: First Grade Unit Topic: Well-adapted Creatures: Bats and Owls Desired Learning Outcomes: Students will know that animals, plants, and people need air, shelter, food, water, and space to live. Students will also know that nocturnal animals are active at night. Essential questions from the Learning objective: What do all living things need to survive? What are nocturnal animals? NCSCOS Goals and Objectives: Science Competency Goal 1: The learner will conduct investigations and ma
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   Lesson OneGrade: First Grade Subject Area: Science  Unit Topic: Well-adapted Creatures: Bats and Owls Day: One Desired Learning Outcomes: Students will know that animals, plants, and people need air, shelter, food, water, and space tolive. Students will also know that nocturnal animals are active at night. Essential questions from the Learning objective: What do all living things need to survive?What are nocturnal animals? NCSCOS Goals and Objectives: Science Competency Goal 1: The learner will conduct investigations and make observations tobuild an understanding of the needs of living organisms. Science Objective 1.02 Investigate the needs of a variety of different animals: ã   Air. ã   Water. ã   Food. ã   Shelter. ã   Space.  Addressed but not assessed: Language Arts Competency Goal 2: The learner will develop and apply strategies and skills tocomprehend text that is read, heard, and viewed. Learner prior knowledge/learner background experiences: ã   Know the difference between living and non-living things. Materials and resources needed: Book   Amazing World of Night Creatures  by Janet CraigBlack and red Expo markersMagic number sticks  Teaching Strategies: In a whole group setting with students on the carpet tell the children that we are beginninga science unit about some animals that like to come out at night and that we will learn morespecifically about two particular animals – bats and owls. Ask students if they have ever seen a bat or an owl, and if few answer, explain that it’s because bats and owls are usually only active atnight, while we are all sleeping. Scientists call animals that are active at night nocturnal. Anticipatory Strategies (Background Knowledge) Read the book   Amazing World of Night Creatures and ask children what they noticedabout the animals in the book. Ask the following questions: ã   Are all the animals in the book living things? ã   Is your chair a living thing? How do you know? ã   What do you think the difference is between living and non-living things? ã   Do living things need certain things to survive? ã   Does a chair need anything to keep being a chair?Use the magic number sticks to give everyone equal opportunity to answer. Remind Jane andHeather that if they raise their hand (which they do ALL the time, they have to have the answer onthe tip of their tongue). Developmental Strategies: Ask the question “What do you need to live?” and list responses on the white board in onecolumn labeled “people”. Then ask what animals need to live and list responses in secondcolumn, and then ask what plants need to live and record the answers in the last column. Guidestudents to basic needs and away from material items – help them generalize from ‘house’ to‘shelter’ and from ‘meat’ to ‘food’.Once each column has been completed, have children look for similarities, movingtowards the five basic needs of air, food, water, shelter, and space. Use the red Expo marker tocircle the similar items of food, air, water, and shelter. They may have a problem with ‘space’ so  guide them to come up with that need by crowding in together on the carpet to see howuncomfortable it would be.Then refer back to the book and tell the children that we are going to spend the next coupleof weeks studying about two of the nocturnal creatures in the book – the owl and the bat. Letthem know that fall is a great time to talk about bats and owls, since we are studying about fallthemes such as Halloween, apples, and seasons changing. Introduce the following vocabularywords: ã   Habitat, environment, and nocturnal ã   Prey, predator, and adaptationsWrite the words nocturnal, adaptations, and habitat on the board and explain again what thewords mean and tell the children that good scientists use these words often and they can use thesewords when they write about animals. Add the words to the fall vocabulary “leaf” (which servesas our theme word wall) so the children can refer to them often. Remind students that ‘nocturnal’is their spelling bonus word for the week. Tell the children that they will be seeing these wordsfrequently in the next few days and ask if they have any questions about the words. Concluding Strategies: Ask five students to give an example of one new thing they learned today that they didn’tknow before, then use those comments to summarize the lesson and get students ready totransition to the next lesson about owls. Ask the essential questions again and see what thestudents say. Get the children excited about the next lesson by telling them that we will belearning more about owls and bats and make sure to ask if they have any questions. Assessment A combination of informal observations of participation during the lesson, anecdotal notes and a   checklist with the five basic needslisted.   Anecdotal Notes on Three Students: Adam listened well and was attentive while I read the book, and he actually really perkedup during the discussion about basic needs of living things. It seems (and would make sense) thatAdam is relatively well read for a first grader and he had no trouble making connections aboutwhat animals need to survive. He even mentioned the word habitat in the discussion of shelter andhomes.Emma paid attention during the reading and our discussion, but she is so shy and reservedthat it was difficult for me to when she understands what we’re talking about or when she isconfused. Answering questions, whether voluntarily or when called upon, really seems to pushher out of her comfort zone and she is evidently extremely introverted. She was not able to recallthe fifth basic need of space.I put Juan right at my feet in front of everyone else so I could easily make eye contact withhim and watch him as I read. At times he seemed to simply “zone out”, and when the childrenlaughed or made comments about the pictures, he would turn his attention back to us. Twice Igently reminded him to listen – once while I was reading, and once while we were making the liston the board. When his magic number was pulled for a question, he was unable to respond andeven though I asked the question three different ways, he did not respond. I don’t know if he can’thear me, doesn’t understand the question, or is too embarrassed to give any answer at all for fear of being wrong. I spent several minutes with him when we listed the five basic needs, but hecould only name air, food, and water. I really think language is a barrier here and I wish I knewhow to speak Spanish. He does well in math but is struggling with reading, writing, and it lookslike I’ll have to figure how to help him understand more than just the vocabulary words specific tothis unit.
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