Matrices Ty p Set Complex Aesthetics

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Typesetting latex for matrices.
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  How to typeset complex yet aesthetically rejoicingmatrices without getting a headache ? Vincent Hugot 19th March 2005 1 Make one’s life easier... Here are listed, higgledy-piggledy, some commands I found useful to define. I feel almoststupid giving them (almost) but I found that obvious though they are, they really help.Besides, as I shall use them a lot later on, I have to explain them anyway, even thoughmost of them are not directly related to matrices. 1.1 Delimiters commands \p adjusts a couple of parenthesis to it’s argument. For instance, \p a produces ( a ), and \p{\f12} produces  12  (one may notice the fraction command \f ). There are numerousversions of this command, some of which are listed below : \newcommand{\p}[1]{\left( #1 \right)} %couple de parenth`eses\newcommand{\pd}[1]{\left\lvert #1 \right\rvert} %couple ||\newcommand{\pdd}[1]{\left\lVert #1 \right\rVert} %couple || ||\newcommand{\pc}[1]{\left[ #1 \right]} %couple []\newcommand{\pa}[1]{\left\{ #1 \right\}} %couple {}\newcommand{\pb}[1]{\left\langle #1 \right\rangle} %couple de par bris´ees\newcommand{\lp}[1]{\left( #1 \right.} %parenth`ese gauche%etc...\newcommand{\rp}[1]{\left. #1 \right)} %parenth`ese droite%etc... 1.2 Matrices-related commands ã \M provides a convenient way to produce a naked matrix (without delimiters) : $\M{1&0\\0&1}$ gives1 00 1 ã It’s variant \pM adds the parenthesis. It is equivalent to \p{\M{...}} .Ex : $\pM{1&0\\0&1}$ produces  1 00 1  ã \mM produces a mini-matrix, suitable for inline use : $\mM{1&0\\0&1}$ donne 1 00 1 1  Vincent Hugot Matrices Licence deMaths 4 ã The variant pmM , obviously enough, produces a small matrix automatically sur-rounded by parenthesis. $\pmM{1&0\\0&1}$ produces ( 1 00 1 ) 2 Diagonal Matrices You might think that those are not really difficult to typeset. And I quite agree withyou on that point. But a final result like this one  a 1 0...0 a n  which was produced by the following code, simple but long for as basic an output, \[\pM{{a_1 } & {} & 0 \\{} & \ddots & {} \\0 & {} & {a_n } \\}\] is nevertheless unfit for unleashing torrents of enthusiasm. Compare it with this : \[ \p{\matdiag {a_1}{a_n}} \]  a 1 0 0000 0 a n  Please notice the beautiful grey color of the non-diagonal terms...which are slightlysmaller than the diagonal ones! Isn’t that marvellous? It is to note that the \matdiag command admits an optional argument. The complete syntax is given below : \[\matdiag[opt]{a_1}{b_2}\] a 1 opt optoptoptopt opt b 2 Keep in mind that this function does not  provide any delimiter. It is therefore up to youto use commands such as \p{} whenever you need them. 3 Simple triangular matrices The \mattrig function provides you with a convenient way to typeset fine simple trian-gular matrices ; it demands no less than five arguments which are respectively : the a 11 and a nn terms of the matrix, the contents of the upper part of the matrix, that of thelower part of the matrix. As for the last one, it is a very special argument, which mustbe an integer and determines which part of the matrix should be emphasized (typically 19th March 2005  Amusing L A TEX Page 2 sur 4  Vincent Hugot Matrices Licence deMaths 4 the non-null part). A value of 0 emphasizes the lower part whereas 1 emphasizes theupper part. If the value is neither 0 nor 1, then both parts stay grey.Example : \[ \mattrig abcd1 \quad \mattrig abcd0 \quad \mattrig abcd2 \] a c cdcd d ba c cdcd d ba c cdcd d b 4 More complex matrices : defining ”blocs”. 4.1 A concrete example meant to entice the customer : TheMatrix of Froebenius \[\pM{\mn a0 & \mn e0 & {} & \mn f0 & {a_1 } \\\mn c1 & {} & {} & {} & \mn k{a_2} \\\mn h0 & {} & {} & \mn g0 & {} \\{} & {} & {} & \mn b0 & \mn l{a_{n - 1} } \\\mn i0 & {} & \mn j0 & \mn d1 & {a_{n - 2} } \\}\matdrawline ab \matdrawline cd\matdrawtri efg \matdrawtri hij\matdrawdottedline kl \] is enough to code the magnificent matrix of Froebenius which follows :  0 0 0 a 1 1 a 2 0 00 a n − 2 0 0 1 a n − 1  to compare with  0 0 ··· 0 a 1 1......... a 2 0......0............0 a n − 2 0 ··· 0 1 a n − 1  produced by the following code \pM{0 & 0 & \cdots & 0 & {a_1 } \\1 & \ddots & \ddots & \vdots & {a_2 } \\0 & \ddots & \ddots & 0 & \vdots \\\vdots & \ddots & \ddots & 0 & {a_{n - 2} } \\0 & \cdots & 0 & 1 & {a_{n - 1} } \\} One doesn’t need glasses to see which one is legible and which one is not... 4.2 Generalist macros The \mn{id}{value} function, (where mn  stands for matrix node), sets a node in thematrix under the name id  . The value value  appears in the body of the matrix. The code \[ \pM{1&0\\0&1}\quad\pM{\mn a1&0\\0&1} \] will produce the following output :  1 00 1   1 00 1  19th March 2005  Amusing L A TEX Page 3 sur 4  Vincent Hugot Matrices Licence deMaths 4 The one and only difference between the two matrices is that in the right one the 1 inthe upper-left corner is marked as the a  node, whereas it is a plain, ordinary 1 in the leftone. One can’t tell them apart with the mere output, as the presence of the nodes hasno influence whatsoever on it.As soon as two, three or four such nodes are defined, you may : ⋄ link two of them by a plain line. ⋄ link two of them by dots. ⋄ link three of them by dots. ⋄ link four of them by dots.by the means of, respectively : ã \matdrawline Id 1 Id 2 Id 3 Id 4 ã \matdrawdottedline [ size ] Id 1 Id 2 Id 3 Id 4 ã \matdrawtri [ size ] Id 1 Id 2 Id 3 Id 4 ã \matdrawbloc [ size ] Id 1 Id 2 Id 3 Id 4 It is obvious that a single node can be used as many times as necessary. The last threemacros listed do also have an optional argument specifying the size of the dots involved.Example : \[\pM{\mn a{a_{11} } & & \mn b{a_{1n} } \\& & \\\mn c{a_{m1} } & & \mn d{a_{mn} } \\}\matdrawdottedline[.5pt]ad\matdrawbloc abdc\]  a 11 a 1 n a m 1 a mn  An amusing property of these functions is that they work everywhere. Example : En d’autres \mn ttermes, les vap de $A$ sont lesracines du polyn^ome caract´eristique de $A$.\\\mn LLe polyn^ome caract´eristique est un invariant de similitude,c’est-`a-dire que deux matrices semblables ont le m^eme polyn^ome\mn ccaract´eristique.\matdrawtri tLc En d’autres termes, les vap de A sont les racines du polynˆome caract´eristique de A .Le polynˆome caract´eristique est un invariant de similitude, c’est-`a-dire que deux matricessemblables ont le mˆeme polynˆome caract´eristique.It is, however, sure that this misuse of those functions isn’t of great interest. It is possiblethanks to the magic of  pstricks , which is the only one to blame...or to praise.A matrix of Froebenius or of similar complexity is the typical field of these macros.Thanks to them, they become simple to type, and easy to read. 19th March 2005  Amusing L A TEX Page 4 sur 4
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