Periods of Ancient Egyptian History2

|
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
 18 views
of 13

Please download to get full document.

View again

Description
http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/prehistory/egypt/history/timeline.html Periods of Ancient Egyptian History Periods (All dates are Before Common Era or B.C.E.) Greek Dynasty- (332 - 30 B.C.E.) Persian Period II - (342 - 332 B.C.E.) Late Period II - (425 - 342 B.C.E.) Persian Period I - (517 - 425 B.C.E.) Late Period I - (1069 - 517 B.C.E.) New Kingdom -(1550 - 1069 B.C.E.) Intermediate Period II - (1650 - 1550 B.C.E.) Middle Kingdom - (2125 - 1650 B.C.E.) Intermediate Period I -(2181 - 2125 B.C.E.
Share
Tags
Transcript
http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/prehistory/egypt/history/timeline.html Periods of Ancient Egyptian History Periods (All dates are Before Common Era or B.C.E.) Greek Dynasty- (332 - 30 B.C.E.) Persian Period II - (342 - 332 B.C.E.) Late Period II - (425 - 342 B.C.E.) Persian Period I - (517 - 425 B.C.E.) Late Period I - (1069 - 517 B.C.E.) New Kingdom -(1550 - 1069 B.C.E.) Intermediate Period II - (1650 - 1550 B.C.E.) Middle Kingdom - (2125 - 1650 B.C.E.) Intermediate Period I -(2181 - 2125 B.C.E.) Old Kingdom - (3100 - 2181 B.C.E.) Archaic Period - (3414 - 3100 B.C.E.) Predynastic Period - (5464 - 3414 B.C.E.) Dynasties 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 32nd Period(B.C.E.) Dynasty Significant PeopleGreek Dynasty (332-30) XXXII Cleopatra VII Ptolemy I Arsinoe II Pompey Alexander Augustus Caesar Persian Period II (342-332) XXXI Darius III Artaxerxes III Late Period II (425-342) XXX Nectanebo I XXIX XXVIII Amyrteos Persian Period I (517-425) XXVII Artaxeres Xerxes Darius I Cambyses Late Period I (1069-517) XXVI Necho II Herodotus XXV Shabaka XXIV Tefnakht XXIII XXII Osoraken I Shoshenk I XXI Psusennes I New Kingdom (1550-1069) XX Ramses III XIX Ramses II XVIII Nefertiti Princess Ankhesenaton Tutankhamun Hatshepsut Tuthmosis I II III IV Ahmose I RekhmireIntermediate Period II (1650-1550) XVII Kamose XVI XV Khyan XIV XIII Middle Kingdom (2125-1650) XII Senusret I II III Amenemhet I II III Intermediate Period I (2181-2125) XI Mentuhotep I X IX Achthoes VIII VII Old Kingdom (3100-2181) VI Pepi II Pepi I Weni V Sahure IV Chepheren Khufu Sneferu III Huni Imhotep Dzoser Archaic Period (3414-3100) II I Menes Predynastic Period (ca5464-3414) Late Middle Early Timeline of Events and Kingdoms in Ancient Egypt Dates (Before Common Era) Significant EventsArchaic 3411 - 3100 Unification of all Egypt Old Kingdom 3100 - 2181 Construction of the pyramids begins First Intermediate 2181 - 2125 Political chaos Middle Kingdom 2125 - 1650 Recovery and political stability Second Intermediate 1650 - 1550 Hyksos invasion New Kingdom 1550 - 1069 Creation of the Egyptian Empire, and Akanaten's religious strategy begins. Early Pre-Dynastic (4,500 - 4,000 B.C.E.) Prior to 4000 B.C.E., Egypt was populated by nomadic tribes complete with different cultures and traditions. Sometime around this date, however, the tribes began to band together. The Early Predynastic is marked by the development of the Faiyum Culture in the north and the Badarian Culture in the South. Differences between the two cultures are primarily in the areas of stone-working, pottery manufacture and the production of flint tools and weapons. Another difference between the two lies in the relative importance of their hunting and fishing activities. The people of the Faiyum tended to aquire their food by non-agrarian methods. The Badarian Culture was based on farming, hunting, and mining. They traded for various products, including wool and turquoise, and made carved objects and pottery. They had a great deal of knowledge about copper ores and how to extract the metals. This era also witnessed advances in furniture and agricultural equipment. There was an obvious development in funeral ritualistic practices, in which the deceased would be buried under the simple protection of a animal skin, but the tomb began to take on a more solid architectural appearance. The production of black-topped pottery, at this time, reached a sophisticated level. Bone and ivory objects such as combs, cosmetic spoons, and female figurines became particularly common. Decorative clay objects were common, in particular those called the “dancer”, or small women with their arms upraised. Artifacts from 3300 B.C.E. indicate further development in both culture and technology. There is evidence among the Naqada of advanced burial and irrigation systems. Small models of houses (similar to those from the Old Kingdom) were found in some of the burial sites. They had larger settlements, and traded with outsiders for materials like lapis lazuli, and are first noted around 4000 B.C.E.. They made decorated pottery, as well as clay and ivory figurines. The pottery had geometric shapes or animals painted or carved on it instead of the previous method of simple banding. Items became more varied in shape, not only for practical reasons, but also for purely aesthetic ones.
Related Search
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks