Team Building Games

|
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
 9 views
of 11

Please download to get full document.

View again

Description
Five pointed Star Objectives Communication | Collaboration | Team Strategy Group Size   Medium Large Materials Long (20 – 50 ft) rope, blindfolds Set Up Lay the rope on the ground in the shape of a circle. It is helpful if the two ends of the rope are tied together (otherwise, it is too simple). Directions The 5 Pointed Star begins with participants gathering around a rope on the ground in the shape of a circle. Participants are instructed to pick up the rope with both hands and then shape
Share
Tags
Transcript
  Five pointed Star Objectives Communication | Collaboration | Team Strategy   Group Size  Medium  Large Materials Long (20  – 50 ft) rope, blindfolds Set Up Lay the rope on the ground in the shape of a circle. It is helpful if the two ends of the rope are tiedtogether (otherwise, it is too simple). Directions The 5 Pointed Star begins with participants gathering around a rope on the ground in the shape of acircle. Participants are instructed to pick up the rope with both hands and then shape the rope into a 5pointed star, with all the overlaps and criss-crosses (just like the kind you drew in elementary school). Theteam must take 4 minutes to come up with a plan and while they are talking they cannot start moving. Itsounds easy enough, but inevitably some eager person starts taking action during planning time - that iswhen the penalties start flying: blindfolds, ankles tied together, walk backwards everywhere you go, etc.Then the team must implement their plan (move) without talking, then plan again, then move again. Oncethey have moved through the four sequences and formed the best star possible they lay the rope on theground and examine their handiwork. Debrief Questions 1. How did you work together?2. What worked well?3. What was challenging?4. What did you learn about yourself?5. What did you learn about the group?  Make a vehicle with your team and explain the same to audience Community Project - Asteroids Description Set-up:Make a dozen or so loops out of rope, approximately 2-4 feet in diameter each. You want to have one loop for every personin your group.The activity: Team members have a “community project” to complete. i.e. big carnival, sports tournament, etc. and need the help of  many community agencies/organizations- represented by the circles.Each team member must come up with ideas regarding whose help they will need to make the event successful. When ateam member suggests a person or organization who's help they may need, they are given a circle.Once each team member has a circle, they must place both of their feet inside the cylinder created by the circle (in otherwords starting at the ground and going infinitely high-but don't give them those instructions) .If everyone is within their circle you are ready to begin. Ask everyone to switch to a new circle. When the group is in transit, take one circle away. Once everyone’s feet are inside the circles, call out for the group to switch and take another circle while the group is in transit. Advise the group that removing circles can represent people or organizations that can no longer help with the event, and the group must try to “pull it off” without them. Participants will begin to become crowded within the circles (be sure to leave a large one for the end).Eventually groups may figure out that only their feet must be within the circle, and they may sit around the large circle withtheir feet piled up within it. LEADERSHIPLearning to LeadTEAM BUILDINGTeam building exercises are different from ice breakers. Ice breakers assist members of a group to get tomeet one another for the first time. Whereas, team building is a cooperative effort by members of agroup to achieve a common goal. Teambuilding occurs when a group of people with complementarypersonal strengths commit to achieve certain focused performance results. A challenging exercise which  requires all the elements of teamwork - communication, goal-setting, planning, cooperation, creativity,task orientation, and problem solve.Team building activities can allow the group to recover from disunity, frustration and conflict. They alsohelp sensitize the team members to behaviors that may contribute toward or obstruct group problemsolving. Behaviors cover such things as good communication, problem solving skills, trust, takingadvantage of the strengths and weaknesses of each team member and understanding the others pointof view.Activities:Helium StickSpider WebBroken SquaresWhat is a team?Helium StickDeceptively simple but powerful exercise for learning how to work together and communicate in smallto medium sized groups.Line up in two rows which face each other.Introduce the Helium Stick - a long, thin, light rod.Ask participants to point their index fingers and hold their arms out.Lay the Helium Stick down on their fingers. Get the group to adjust their finger heights until the HeliumStick is horizontal and everyone's index fingers are touching the stick.Explain that the challenge is to lower the Helium Stick to the ground.The catch: Each person's fingers must be in contact with the Helium Stick at all times. Pinching orgrabbing the pole in not allowed - it must rest on top of fingers.  Reiterate to the group that if anyone's finger is caught not touching the Helium Stick, the task will berestarted. Let the task begin....Warning: Particularly in the early stages, the Helium Stick has a habit of mysteriously 'floating' up ratherthan coming down, causing much laughter. A bit of clever humoring can help - e.g., act surprised and askwhat are they doing raising the Helium Stick instead of lowering it! For added drama, jump up and pullit down!Participants may be confused initially about the paradoxical behavior of the Helium Stick.Some groups or individuals (most often larger size groups) after 5 to 10 minutes of trying may beinclined to give up, believing it not to be possible or that it is too hard.The facilitator can offer direct suggestions or suggest the group stops the task, discusses their strategy,and then has another go.Less often, a group may appear to be succeeding too fast. In response, be particularly vigilant aboutfingers not touching the pole. Also make sure participants lower the pole all the way onto the ground.You can add further difficulty by adding a large washer to each end of the stick and explain that thewashers should not fall off during the exercise, otherwise it's a restart.Eventually the group needs to calm down, concentrate, and very slowly, patiently lower the Helium Stick- easier said than done.TimeTotal time ~25 mins~5 minute briefing and set up~10-15 minutes of active problem-solving (until success)~10 minutes discussionHow Does it Work?The stick does not contain helium. The secret (keep it to yourself) is that the collective upwardspressure created by everyone's fingers tends to be greater than the weight of the stick. As a result, themore a group tries, the more the stick tends to 'float' upwards.Processing IdeasWhat was the initial reaction of the group?How well did the group cope with this challenge?
Related Search
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks