Transitions in a Nontraditional World: Second Career, Military to Civilian, Ex-offenders, and Returning Mothers

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Transitions in a Nontraditional World: Second Career, Military to Civilian, Ex-offenders, and Returning Mothers. Beth Lulgjuraj, M.S., Ed.S. Ashley Chason, M.S., Ed.S. Shawn Utecht, M.S. Florida State University, The Career Center NCDA Conference, July 2008. Background.
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Transitions in a Nontraditional World: Second Career, Military to Civilian, Ex-offenders, and Returning Mothers Beth Lulgjuraj, M.S., Ed.S. Ashley Chason, M.S., Ed.S. Shawn Utecht, M.S. Florida State University, The Career Center NCDA Conference, July 2008 Background Military to Civilian, Ex-offenders, and Returning Mothers Progression of career choice Number of people in transition Knowing about resources Metacognitions Second Careers Military to Civilian, Ex-offenders, and Returning Mothers Definition of Second Career Military to Civilian, Ex-offenders, and Returning Mothers Taken a second job after retiring Worked in field for an extended period and would like to change profession (ex., lawyer, teacher, executive) Sometimes searching for a second career is not voluntary! Because there is no clear definition of "career change”, accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible.(Terkanian, D. Summer 2006) What do we know? accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. About 1/3 of our workforce changes jobs yearly (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2005) 44 – 70 years of age: half who are not yet in second careers want to be (Princeton Survey Research Associates International, 2005) 45% of workers age 45-54 are content with their current jobs Nearly 50% of workers 55+ are satisfied with their employment situation (The Conference Board, 2007 ) A More Experienced Workforce accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. In 2000, 18.4 million persons over age 55, were in the labor force 31.8 million older labor force participants in 2015 33.3 million older persons will be in the labor force in 2025 (Bureau of Labor Statistics,2005) 4 million more jobs than workers by 2011 (Employment Policy Foundation) What is Important ? accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. 59%: staying involved with other people 57%: job giving them a sense of purpose 52%: job providing additional income 48%: job providing the opportunity to help improve the quality of life in their community (Peter D. Hart Research Associates, Inc., 2008) Challenges accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. Everyday job search difficulties Values-interest Identification of transferable skills Upgrading skills Finances Pensions Health Care Age discrimination Strengths accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. Time to look Experience Networking Volunteering Flexibility Consider consulting/small business Demographics Second Career Policy accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible.
  • Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA)
  • The Older Worker Opportunity Act
  • The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA)
  • Advocacy Resources accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. Websites Specifically for Workers 40+ AARP- National Employer Team Maturity Works Alliance – National Council on Aging The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) State Resources Local or Regional Resource Military to Civilian accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. Significance accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. 1.4 million service personnel (Office of Army Demographics, 2004a, 2004b, 2004c, 2004d) Majority will transition into the civilian workforce (Clemens & Milsom, 2008) Military Transition Services (Military and Veterans’ Benefits, 2002) Limited data available on effectiveness of programs Many enlisted service members don’t use the services Challenges accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. Readjusting to civilian life Deciphering benefits Health Issues Aptitudes not values interests and skills Limited process/content career knowledge Translating skills and accomplishments Networking Strengths accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible.
  • Veterans Employment, Education, and Training Programs
  • Veterans Preference
  • State Veteran's Benefit Programs
  • State Employment Services
  • Documented Evaluations/Recruited skills
  • Networking
  • Websites/Job boards
  • GI Jobs – To 50 Companies
  • Nonprofit Organizations
  • Military to Civilian accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible.and Policy Update of GI Bill (military.com) Veteran’s Preference for Federal Jobs Veterans’ Workforce Investment Program Educational and Vocational Counseling Services Veterans’ EmploymentOpportunities Act (US Dept of Veterans Affairs, http://www1.va.gov/opa/IS1/10.asp) Advocacy Resources accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. Military Transition Services (Veterans Education and Benefits Expansion Act, 2001; DD Form 2648, 2005; Military and Veterans’ Benefits, 2002) Pre-separation and Job Counseling Transition Assistance Workshops Placement Services Financial Planning Employment Campaign Assistance Using CIP Theory Teach client to make career decisions while working on current gap Discuss transferrable skills: DD Form 214 = report of separation Ex-Offenders accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. Significance accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible.
  • 630,000 people released from state and federal prisons every year (Samuels & Mukamal, 2004)
  • In 2005, over 7 million people were under some form of correctional supervision (James & Glaze, 2006)
  • Between 38%-47% of mentally ill inmates were not employed in the month before their arrest (James & Glaze, 2006)
  • Recidivism Issue accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible.
  • 67% of state inmates released in 1994 committed at least one serious new crime within 3 years (Butterfield, 2002)
  • More education=increased chance of employment
  • Work experience while in prison seems to reduce recidivism after release (Jenkins, Steurer, and Pendry,1995)
  • Recidivism more linked to employment (or lack of) than background characteristics (Klein & Caggiano, 1986)
  • Factors Inhibiting Employment accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible.
  • Public Policy
  • Corporate/Organizational Policy
  • Discrimination
  • Skill Deficiencies
  • Social Factors
  • Strengths accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible.
  • May be more willing to start in minimum-wage jobs
  • Many have employment and training in UNICOR, and/or in vocational and occupational training programs
  • Work Opportunity Tax Credit
  • Job Training Partnership Act (BOP, 2008)
  • Advocacy Resources accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible.
  • Job placement services and employment contacts
  • supplemented with support services and skill development
  • Example:
  • Project Reconnect
  • placement rate of 3,000 jobs a year with 50% retention rate
  • Advocacy Resources cont accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible..
  • Offenders average rating for a job skills training program’s usefulness- 9/10
  • At time of arrest, only 26% of these were working
  • Increased to 92% after release and training (Sung, 2001)
  • Bottom Line accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible.
  • “Crime is unlikely among those who are well-trained and attractive to employers” (Sung, 2001, p. 282)
  • “The public is best protected when criminal offenders are rehabilitated …the ability to find meaningful employment is directly related to their normal functioning in the community” (Section 46a-79)
  • Returning Mothers accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. Sandra Day O’Conner
  • Brenda Barnes
  • Chief Executive Officer, Sara Lee
  • Significance accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. 5.6 million stay-at-home moms in 2006(U.S. Census Bureau, a) 3/10 pregnant women quit job before baby’s arrival(Wellner, 2004) ~84% Generation X moms plan to return to workforce(Armour, 2004) > ½ of moms with young children work(American Academy of Pediatrics, 2007) 70% of stay-at-home moms want to return part-time(Armour, 2004) Reasons Moms Return accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. Personal fulfillment Need income Many have husbands who earn <$30,000/year > ¼ are single-parent homes and moms provide most support Higher self-esteem Social contacts Intellectual stimulation (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2007) Challenges accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. Feelings/self-confidence Balancing work, family, & self Child care Financial concerns Benefits Gaps in resume Current technology skills Need flexible schedule Strengths accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible.
  • Experience
  • Transferrable skills
  • Network
  • Professional association memberships
  • Current knowledge
  • Employers are interested (Now Hiring, 2007)
  • Returning Mothers and Policy accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. Family Medical and Leave Act (U.S. Department of Labor, b) Making sure moms don’t permanently leave Giving more maternity leave Deloitte & Touche (Armour, 2004) Advocacy Resources accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible. Websites Commissions Associations Summits Symposiums Books Schlossberg’s Transition Framework accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible.
  • Situation
  • Self
  • Support
  • Strategies (Schlossberg, 2006)
  • Discussion & Questions accurate counting of career changers is difficult, if not impossible.
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