Czechoslovakia and helsinki

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1. Czechoslovakia, 1968 and the Helsinki Accords, 1975 2. Times were changing <ul><li>12 years after brutal suppression of Hungary, Czechoslovakia posed a…
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  • 1. Czechoslovakia, 1968 and the Helsinki Accords, 1975
  • 2. Times were changing <ul><li>12 years after brutal suppression of Hungary, Czechoslovakia posed a similar threat to Soviet domination. </li></ul><ul><li>In the 1960’s a new mood developed in Czechoslovakia . </li></ul><ul><li>Over the course of 20 years, the people became unhappy with Soviet control. </li></ul><ul><li>Alexander Dubcek replaced Stalin’s leader of choice in 1967 </li></ul>
  • 3. Alexander Dubcek <ul><li>Dubcek was a committed Communist, but felt it had become restrictive. </li></ul><ul><li>He proposed: “Socialism with a human face”. </li></ul><ul><li>This meant, less censorship, more freedom of speech and reduction of the secret police. </li></ul><ul><li>No intention to pull out of Warsaw Pact or Comecom. </li></ul>Alexander Dubcek
  • 4. The Prague Spring <ul><li>With the relaxation of censorship, intellectuals began to barrage Communist leaders over corruption and their useless running of the country. </li></ul><ul><li>Ministers were humiliated live on television and radio. </li></ul><ul><li>This time was known as ‘The Prague Spring’. </li></ul>Ludvik Vanculik, a leading figure in the reform movement.
  • 5. Soviet Response <ul><li>These ideas from Czechoslovakia caused serious concern for other Communist countries. </li></ul><ul><li>They argued with Dubcek </li></ul><ul><li>Performed military exercises on its border. </li></ul><ul><li>Thought about economic sanctions – though they feared this would make them seek help from the West. </li></ul>Walter Ulbricht (East German leader) and Wladyslaw Gomulka (Polish leader)
  • 6. Invasion <ul><li>20 th August, to the amazement of the Czechs, Soviet tanks moved in. </li></ul><ul><li>There was little violent resistance. </li></ul><ul><li>Dubcek socialism with a human face had not failed, but proved unacceptable. </li></ul><ul><li>Brezhnez worried the precedent Czech reforms would have on other European countries. </li></ul>
  • 7. The aftermath <ul><li>Dubeck was demoted and eventually expelled from Communist Party. </li></ul><ul><li>Brezhnez doctrine over essentials of Communism: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One-party system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Member of Warsaw Pact. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Mood of Czech people after invasion shifted from optimism to despair. </li></ul><ul><li>Ideas potentially reforming Communism silenced. </li></ul>
  • 8. Task <ul><li>Explain the impact of invading Czechoslovakia (2 nd paragraph under “Czechoslovakia, 1968 p.106) </li></ul><ul><li>Explain what the Helsinki Accords were and how they impacted on life within the Soviet Union, p.106-7. </li></ul>
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