rhetorical analysis

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Miller 1 Karen Miller Lori Bedell CAS 137H 002 5 October 2017 Tobacco remains the number one preventable cause of death in the United States today, despite its consumption being at an all-time low. Marijuana consumption, however, is experiencing opposite trends, recently gaining a strong footing in society by becoming known as a safe, harmless drug used for recreation. Advertisements such as
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  Miller 1 Karen Miller Lori Bedell CAS 137H 002 5 October 2017 Tobacco remains the number one preventable cause of death in the United States today, despite its consumption being at an all-time low. Marijuana consumption, however, is experiencing opposite trends, recently gaining a strong footing in society by becoming known as a safe, harmless drug used for recreation. Advertisements such as the “ Kill a cigarette. Save a life. Yours.” have begun to address the issue of tobacco use and attempt to evoke change in the habits of our younger generations. However, ads such as Chipotle ’s that compares the rolling of a burrito to the rolling of a cigarette, have taken advantage of the emerging pop culture surrounding the use of illegal drugs, specifically marijuana, in an attempt to connect more closely with their audience. Targeting similar demographics, the anti-smoking and the Chipotle ads both employ stylistic choices and intrinsic proofs in varying ways in order to send two very different messages regarding competing ideologies about the newfound popularity of smoking,  particularly weed, for recreation among young adults. Interestingly, these two very different ads, hoping to achieve two completely different goals, share the same audience. Both advertisements target a young audience, but depict the use of drugs and the act of smoking in opposite lights. Ninety percent of smokers began before the age of 19, and thirty percent of these smokers will die from a smoking related disease (DoSomething.org). Smoking is a serious issue among young people, which is why the anti-smoking ad desperately reaches out to a younger audience to show them the harm smoking can cause, using the image of a young man to relate to a younger audience. In recent years, marijuana has been believed to be the most used drug among teens; an idea which is reflected in the  Miller 2 Chipotle ad that compares the rolling of a burrito to the rolling of a blunt. Chipotle has become a staple among teens and young adults, serving as a meeting place or social hang out. Chipotle utilizes the power and attention they hold over their young audience to try to relate to them through a comparison of two things most teenagers are familiar with. These ads, despite having similar audiences, support competing ideologies that make each of their claims more powerful. It has long been a commonplace that smoking kills. Tobacco use saw rapid growth during the 1930s and 1940s, however began to steadily decrease as soon as health effects started to be reported out in the mid-1900s (National Library of Medicine). The fact that smoking is harmful and destructive is a dominant ideology, called upon by the artifact against smoking. Marijuana, specifically the recreational cannabis market, is the fastest growing U.S. industry, growing 74%  just in 2014. The emerging ideology that marijuana is “safe” and “fun” is what prompted Chipotle to make an ad that insinuated about the “goodness” of marijuana and relate that to the flavor of their food. Chipotle’s ad was a response to the kairotic moment of the rise in consumption and use of marijuana. Marijuana found an emergence in today’s society as being a safe drug; however, many people who find themselves continuously using the drug develop a dependence and can abuse the drug, proving that marijuana is not truly represented by its reputation of being a safe option (DrugAbuse.com). Both ads employ similar stylistic choices in terms of color scheme, depicting their messages in all black and white shades. However, the ways in which they use this color scheme create two completely different tones. The ad against smoking is primarily black, while the Chipotle ad is primarily white. The anti-smoking ad, by using darker colors and choosing to utilize a completely black background establishes a much more serious, somber tone than that of the Chipotle ad. Black is often associated with death, immediately notifying the viewer that this  Miller 3 ad is not trivial. The small amount of light color the ad did use stands out against the dark  background, signaling the importance of the lightened features. The smoke shaped as a gun is lightened to emphasize the effects of smoking. The face of the young man is also lightened to express where the problem lies, which is in the individual and among younger generations. By  pointing to the individual, the ad calls its audience to action, making it clear that the only person who can save them from the consequences of smoking is themselves. The Chipotle ad takes a different approach by using white as the background, creating a much brighter, livelier mood. The roll of the burrito is a grayish reflective material, symbolizing the ads effort to reflect the culture of our current society. Through its short slogan , “Gourmet Burritos,   Addictive Flavor,” Chipotle connects   burritos and marijuana through the strategic wo rd choice of “addictive.” Chipotle  employs logos, acknowledging that the weed is addictive, and transforms this alarming reality by associating it with the addictiveness of food. The ad lessens the severity of addictiveness and the stigma surrounding drug use by lightheartedly making the comparison to Chipotle products. The anti-smoking ad, divergently, uses logos to express the effects of smoking to their fullest and most drastic. The ad states “Kill a cigarette.  S ave a life. Yours.” Similar   to the Chipotle ad, word choice allows this logical appeal to be effective. By using the word “kill,” the audience is immediately forced to consider death. It is common knowledge that smoking is harmful, and by showcasing this statement on the ad, the destruction that inevitably follows the abuse or overuse of tobacco products is brought into light. The lethal nature of cigarettes portrayed in the ad against smoking also lends itself to  producing emotional appeals. The gun shape the smoke forms alludes to a form of suicide. The gun represents that, as individuals, people are not helpless against the evils of smoking but can  Miller 4 choose to save themselves. The smoke appears bright against the dark background, emphasizing the power and control smoking can have on your life. By choosing to engage in smoking, one is accepting the risks and willing to gamble their life and their future in turn for the short-term enjoyment or image a cigarette offers. The Chipotle ad lacks in pathos, and instead employs a humor to its audience as well as an appeal to ethos. By suggesting that burritos and blunts are similar, Chipotle aims to connect with their audience by presenting themselves as an engaging, relatable company that understands the views of their customers. Unlike the anti-smoking ad whose sole purpose is to help their audience, Chipotle has invested part of their own stake into this ad and hopes to achieve a goal that will directly affect them. They want to expand and grow their business, and they make use of a trendy topic in an attempt to help themselves. The ad against smoking and the Chipotle ad both target the same audience, but support two competing ideologies. The Chipotle ad addresses the emerging ideology of smoking marijuana as the cool and now safe thing to do while the anti-smoking ad supports the dominant ideology that smoking is harmful by spreading awareness of the effects of smoking through the  powerful imagery seen in the ad. The maintenance of one’s image in today’s society drives many  people’s decision making, especially teenagers and young adults who are the most susceptible to influence. Smoking has increasingly become a part of this shared social experience among younger generations and the only way for this to lose traction is by spreading knowledge and enforcing individual growth, a message the anti-smoking ad hopes to send; however, large corporations, including Chipotle, who take advantage of teenage influence on society, are inhibiting us from making progress.
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