Sustainable Skills Development Annual Meeting

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Sustainable Skills Development Annual Meeting. April 19 2005 Niagara College Welland, Ontario. Agenda. Welcome & Opening Remarks: Jos Nolle & Kyla Pennie South African Update Update of Year 2: Lindsay Page Update of Tourism Activities: Luvuyo Mlilo & Mawethu Ndlumane
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Sustainable Skills Development Annual MeetingApril 19 2005Niagara CollegeWelland, OntarioAgenda Welcome & Opening Remarks: Jos Nolle & Kyla Pennie South African Update Update of Year 2: Lindsay Page Update of Tourism Activities: Luvuyo Mlilo & Mawethu Ndlumane Results Based Management & Challenges: Kyla Pennie Closing Remarks: Martha CassonSSD PROJECT
  • Assist government to transform labour market through skills development.
  • SSD PROJECTProject Overview
  • SSD Goal & Purpose:
  • To build strategic partnership networks in education, government, industry and the community in support of poverty reduction through skills development.
  • Institutional CapacityWhat is a Learnership?
  • A work-based approach to learning and gaining qualifications and includes both structured work experience (practical) and structured institutional learning (theory).
  • Includes a structured learning component
  • Includes practical work experience
  • Leads to a qualification
  • Relates to an occupation
  • Update Mxolisi Sibam (Prince)- Director, Finance Alfred Bomvu- Registrar, ECT Badikazi Mpongwana, Department of LabourStatus of merger: Walter Sisulu University of Technology & Science Department of Labour: Learnership updateAnother world is not only possible, she is on her way. And on a quiet day, if you really listen, you can hear her breathing. (R.M. Rilke)Pivotal issues: Community Outreach Institutional Capacity Partnership Development Project Management Update on 2004-5 ActivitiesPartnership DevelopmentThe importance of working with local partners is essential in creating collaborative solutions and initiatives, ensuring sustainability and effectively engaging the community.
  • Eastern Cape Tourism Board
  • TABEISA (Technical and Business Education in South Africa)
  • UNITRA (University of the Transkei)
  • Border Technikon
  • Steve Biko Foundation
  • Sosebenza Sonke Women’s Development Project
  • Ikhwezi Lokusa HIV/AIDS Wellness Centre
  • The Business Place
  • Institutional Capacity
  • September 2004
  • Project Learnership Workshop
  • This provided each department at ECT to actively engage in dialogue with representatives from relevant Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs).
  • Recognized needto generate strategiesfor learnership process
  • It is what we make of what we have, not what we are given, that separates one person from another.(Nelson Mandela)Institutional Capacity (cont’d)September 2004:
  • Canadian Interns’ Arrival
  • Interns assist the project strengthen partnerships and engage communities while bringing energy, skill and enthusiasm to outreach programs.
  • HIV/AIDS interns at:
  • Ikhwezi Lokusa Wellness Centre
  • Sosebenza Sonke Women’s Development Project
  • Eastern Cape Technikon
  • Business Development and Training intern at The Business Place
  • Institutional Capacity (cont’d)February 2005
  • Project Management Team Strategic Planning Retreat: Johannesburg
  • Brainstorming which resulted in a list of proposed project activities for 2005-2006 workplan
  • Project management team members had the opportunity to examine and share information, consider the project’s strategic direction and generate ideas.
  • Community Outreach: Entrepreneurship ActivitiesJune 2004
  • Self-Employment Partnership (SEP) Program
  • Micro-credit initiative in Butterworth
  • November 2004
  • Entrepreneurship Training
  • Visiting Canadian professionals conducted entrepreneurship and tourism training workshops
  • Community Outreach: Entrepreneurship Activities (cont’d)February 2005
  • Entrepreneurship Strategic Planning & Program Design
  • Looking to support the creation of SMME’s
  • A group of women entrepreneurs has been mobilized in King William’s Town (through The Business Place) and has co-created a peer support network.
  • Emphasis on strengthening partnerships with relevant service providers and design an entrepreneurial program:
  • mentorship
  • practical implementation
  • financial assistance.
  • Whatever you can do or dream you can, begin it.Boldness has genius, power and magic in it.(Goethe)Community Outreach (cont’d)Tourism InitiativesMay 2004
  • Municipal Twinning: Welland, Ontario & Mnquma Municipality, South Africa
  • Tourism Awareness Campaign:
  • The aim is to educate and engage communities in the importance of tourism as a method of economic development.
  • Community Outreach (cont’d)August 2004
  • Launch of Discover Initiative
  • In partnership with ECTB, the Discover Butterworth brand sought to encourage pride in the Butterworth community, and develop a culture of tourism.
  • September 2004
  • The Discover Butterworth competition aimed to engagethe community to generate ways to attract tourists, as well as encouraging staff, student, and faculty collaboration.
  • Community Outreach (cont’d)February-April 2005Tourism Partnership Development
  • Small Projects Foundation
  • Possible collaboration with tourism learnership
  • King Sandile Development Trust:
  • Mnquma Municipality Local Tourism Organization (LTO):
  • Eastern Cape Tourism Board (ECTB):
  • ECT tourism students to promote Tourism Month Competitions
  • Project Management
  • August 2004
  • Gender Analysis, Butterworth
  • Recognizing the need to incorporate gender-specific needs into project strategy, a gender needs analysis was conducted in Butterworth.
  • Goal was to determine lifestyles, priorities, and values of male and female participants in order to inform project strategy.
  • Project Management (cont’d)February 2005
  • Gender Analysis, King William’s Town
  • Working with a group of women entrepreneurs, the analysis sought to determine the distinct needs, environments and potential of the group.
  • Key goals were examining where the women were on the entrepreneurship continuum and determining ways through which the project could support them.
  • The Year Ahead Where are we now? Community Outreach Institutional Capacity Project Management Partnership DevelopmentWhere Are We Now?
  • 2005-6 marks Year 3 of the SSD project
  • Critical midpoint of project activities
  • Merger is imminent
  • Scope of project is wide; communities across the province have worked with the SSD project
  • Project Management
  • Staffing
  • ACE Entrepreneurship intern (Canada)
  • Movement
  • May:
  • In-country project coordinator: Lindsay Page
  • July:
  • Special Events Coordinator Intern
  • Tourism Development Intern
  • September:
  • Jos Nolle & Dr. Dan Patterson to South Africa
  • 2 HIV/AIDS Canadian interns
  • Community Outreach (cont’d)
  • Community Tourism & Entrepreneurship Awareness Campaign
  • Goal: Assist communities in developing an understanding of tourism development and entrepreneurship
  • Students will be mentoredby a local organization; either The Business Place (KWT) or TABEISA (EL/Butterworth).
  • Community Outreach (cont’d)
  • Mnquma Municipality
  • Establish and formalize areas of collaboration
  • Brochure development, audit of attractions, etc.
  • Training Materials
  • Add to current training manual:
  • rural community development
  • heritage tourism
  • sustainable tourism
  • customer care
  • entrepreneurship/ business skill
  • Community Outreach (cont’d)
  • Annual tourism event: Butterworth
  • To encourage people to start SMME’s to service the event,
  • Showcase local entrepreneurs and talent
  • Hold seminars/workshops to share information among tourism stakeholders
  • Community Outreach (cont’d)
  • Heritage Monument
  • Consider developing attraction that will provide legacy for SSD Project and the contribution of its participants and stakeholders, unique to theEastern Cape.
  • Discover Initiative
  • Expand similar initiatives in other areas (i.e. King William’s Town)
  • Community Outreach (cont’d)
  • Entrepreneurship Pilot Program
  • Goal:
  • Brings together existing service providers to offer meaningful and sustainable support in the creation of 5 viable tourism businesses.
  • Community Awareness
  • Developing a culture of entrepreneurship and an environment that supports tourism is essential.
  • SA FACT:Per 100 people, 7 personal computers are in use.Community Outreach (cont’d)(Entrepreneurship Pilot)
  • Mentorship
  • Each entrepreneur will be matched with an experiential learning student “business coach” as well as a corporate mentor.
  • Long-term, comprehensive support
  • Life skills, HIV/AIDS, customer service, budgeting, and other trainings will be offered to ensure a holistic approach.
  • Community Outreach (cont’d)
  • Emphasis on “deliverables” and process
  • Entrepreneurs must undergo market research, etc.,
  • Access to start-up financing
  • Most viable business plan will receive a grant/loan.
  • Administration and structure of grant/loan?
  • Partnership Development
  • Tourism Learnership
  • Small Projects Foundation: ECT possibly training provider
  • Experiential Learning Opportunities
  • Mnquma LTO, King Sandile Development Trust, Small Projects Foundation
  • Eastern Cape Tourism Board (ECTB)
  • Promotion of Tourism Month (September) Schools Competition
  • SA FACT:84% of black women believe they are in control of their life and future.Partnership Development
  • Advancing Canadian Entrepreneurship (ACE)
  • On-campus non-profit organization at universities and colleges in Canada
  • Develop relationship with Eastern Cape community-based project to import and sell goods.
  • Possibly Hlumani HIV/AIDS project, King Kei Crafters
  • SSD Project Snapshot of Results2002-2005Current activitiesCommunity OutreachInstitutional CapacityPartnership DevelopmentProject ManagementAreas to develop to promote sustainabilitySuggestions?Ideas?Best practices?RESULT-build strategic partnerships to reduce poverty through skills development and income generation (%)Mentorship builds confidenceIncrease participation of local consultantsCollaborative project planning/managementLead by example – women in leadership roles New positions createdplanningMajority of project coordinators are womenLocal role modelsHOW they participateMentor and incorporate more gender planning in new learnerships (or other initiatives) at WSUAre women perceived as decision-makers (by self and others?)Technikon staff, including women, and project stakeholders enhance strong leadership development skills (80%)Advisory Board has strong, diverse representationRepresentatives able to garner benefits for their constituencies (i.e.: Connie Kakana)Encourage less established groups to “piggy back” with other groupsProgressive structures to increase participationSeek measurable impacts (gender-sensitive indicators)Translation to XhosaDisadvantaged population groups, particularly women, represented in decision-making and project guidance (80%)Rural Tourism and Entrepreneurship outreach South African module developmentEmpowering pedagogyFurther integrate ECT training opportunities into basic modules (-information resource component)What about financial?Numeracy and LiteracyRural community members, both male and female, gain understanding and motivation to enter training programs at the TechnikonSuccessful partnership development has led to first learnership (WR-SETA)Plans for implementation for 5 more learnerships this yearNew WSU institutional streaming policies must embrace learnership opportunityBe opportunisticStronger community ties provide better employment opportunitiesStudents have greater access opportunities to education and training through a variety of programming streams to meet their diverse needs (25%)Working closely with DOL and SETAs keeps Technikon informed of training procedures and opportunitiesSSD workshop (Sept) brings together playersWays to increase transparency and reduce bureaucracy?The Technikon is capable of supporting National Skills Development Strategy institutional education and training needs (50%)Consolidation and cooperation with local operators Varied approachesCommunity partnerships twinningFocus on tourismFurther engage advisory board to works towards sustainability (commitments to developments)The Technikon strengthens its capacity to meet Eastern Cape workforce and entrepreneurship needs through the support of provincial and national education and training policies (60%)First ECT learnerships have been delivered!!!Niagara best practices are shared (YIP programs, Netcorps, ACE)Strategize rollout within academic divisions at WSU Local context- Work closely with funders to identify local models that will meet training needsMotivation for stakeholdersThe Technikon develops models and partnerships for education and training services (20%)Tourism roadshows encourages participation in rural communitiesOutreach is using brand recognition to engage community and youth. “Discover” campaignLink must now be made from basic education to higher educationAddress literacy and numeracy challenges in Higher EducationAddress financial constraintsEastern Cape rural communities gain exposure to potential for self-advancement through tourism education and training at the Technikon (80%)Entrepreneurship Pilot program assists in process to start new businessesRoadshow approach with local orgs supportUse “Discover” initiative to increase understanding of tourismDevelop community based tourism market with community planning via stakeholder advisory inputCommunities must champion the processLearnerships to support skill developmentSkilled entrepreneurs, both male and female, for new business developments in community-based tourism market (40%)Partnership network development (The Business place, Tabeisa)Twinning activities (Ace, Welland, Rotary)Support and engage students and graduatesNetwork must exist after project endsChallenging atmosphere- need infrastructure development, financingNew tourism businesses established in the Eastern Cape region (30%)Off the mark!We still don’t know enough about itToo ambitious(?)Initiative has had many obstaclesResearch to be conductedNew partnerships sought as potential employersSkilled labour provided for the South African Wild Coast Spatial Development Initiative(0%)Learners are employed (10 in grocery stores via W&R)Learning opportunity – engage stakeholders to support learnershipsNeed to be opportunisticResearch via external relations unit at WSU to match market needs with learnership applsDepartment of Labour Occupational Workplace Skills Training needs supported and skilled labour, including women, provided to various sectors(20%)Merger is delaying services developmentPartnership network will assist Technikon in this processMini-road showsContinue all other outreach activities to prepare for services branch/External relations unit at WSUSector Education and Training Authorities assisted in administration and outreach for Skills Plans development via Technikon services (15%)SSD has engaged community stakeholders with Advisory GroupSSD an enabler for SETA’s to work with TechnikonSSD workshop in September-key activityWSU embraces external relations concept and fund it accordingly – create a long-term development planAB supports new WSU external relations unit for further research, and skills trainingSETAs to play active role in development and supportECT positions itself through services offeredThe Technikon recognized as a regional education and training centre for workplace skills training, learnerships, and entrepreneurship training (25%)Sustainability
  • SSD project can be used as a catalyst for undertaking new activities, and assisting ECT to manage change.
  • Need for ECT and NC to support each other through the change process
  • Challenges & Issues
  • Focus on learnerships
  • Confirm and engage SETAs to support learnerships
  • Formalize agreements with partner employers
  • Critical that activities correspond to an expected result (review RBM)
  • Project efficiency
  • Utilization of resources to full potential.
  • Challenges & Issues
  • Scope of project
  • Communities and populations have been mobilized: how can we support them, remain relevant and offer new initiatives?
  • Importance of open communication
  • Aids efficiency and time
  • Maintain collective focus, generate ideas and collaborative solutions.
  • And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same.Nelson MandelaT H A N K Y O U
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